Who cares about the Amazon?

Issues Education

The Amazon rainforest stabilizes regional and global weather patterns, drives rainfall and helps curtail climate change, but it is reaching an irreversible tipping point which threatens our climate and collective future, requiring urgent action.

Why it matters

The Amazon rainforest stabilizes regional and global weather patterns, drives rainfall and helps curtail climate change, but it is reaching an irreversible tipping point which threatens our climate and collective future, requiring urgent action.

Indigenous peoples have effectively conserved their rainforest territories for millenia and yet their rights, lives and territories are facing increasing threats. Defending the defenders of the Amazon is an environmental, human rights and racial justice priority.

The Amazon is also home to the largest and most biodiverse collection of flora and fauna. Defending rainforests goes hand-in-hand with the global need to prevent mass extinction.

Preserving the Amazon is essential to preserving the future of our planet. Young people recognize that their future on a livable planet is at risk if the Amazon rainforest collapses, its people and cultures are destroyed.